Monday, December 17, 2007

Holidays + New Materials = Fun Times!

Just in time for the holidays, the library has received new materials! We have a brand new novel titled “When the News Went Live: Dallas 1963” by Bob Huffaker, Bill Mercer George Phenix, and Wes Wise. This book describes all the different facets of news and media in front of the camera and behind the scenes. It covers all kinds of material from radio to criminals, it is definitely a good read. Next we have a new book of American poetry! It is titled “A Time In Eternity” and the poet is David Galler. We have also received a new book by John C. Cothran called “A Search of African American Life, Achievement, and Culture”. It has over 1,800 facts, questions and answers and over 400 photographs and illustrations. It covers topics ranging from art, children, military history and sports. In addition to the books, we have a new edition of the periodical Dimensions of Early Childhood. It is volume 35, Number 3 and in the issue it discusses Brazelton infant and toddler touchpoints, professional development, emotional intelligence, infants on the move and many more topics!

For all of you psychology majors out there, we have the latest edition to Current Psychotherapies. It is the eighth edition, edited by Raymond J. Corsini and Danny Wedding. This book is used quite often in today’s top counseling, psychology, and social work programs. It is the ideal resource to help you not only excel in the course but also to learn, compare, and apply the major systems of psychotherapy in a way that will be meaningful in your own practice. Also new to the library are new editions of Hoover’s MasterList of U.S. Companies. This comprehensive selection of the 10,000 most important companies in America includes: 5,704 publicly traded companies, including all companies on the New York, American, and NASDAQ Global and Global Select Market exchanges, plus a selection of over-the-counter stocks; 2,536 private companies, partnerships, and mutual companies; 1,667 subsidiaries and business segments of large corporations; and 103 associations, foundations, cooperatives, universities, non-profit organizations, and government agencies.

Two more novels that we are now in possession of are titled "The Communication Coach" by Janet Sue Rush and "The Lucky Bastard Club" by Roy Fisher. Don't those sound very interesting and enticing? Come into the library to see what they are all about!


3 comments:

Anonymous said...

REVIEWS:
Jim Lehrer – The NewsHour Here, finally, is the view from the street about November 22, 1963. This reporters' account of the Kennedy assassination brings to full focus the personal anguish as well as the professional pressure endured that day by those who could not take the time to cry. This book will become part of the real and permanent history of a dark day for America.

Kent Biffle - The Dallas Morning News
This book has more legs than the Rockettes. The slim page-turner possesses a crisp, objective quality that, like a good movie, never stops moving.

Bob Schieffer - CBS News
The first accounts of how the Kennedy assassination happened came from the local radio and TV reporters of Dallas. For the first time, some of the best of those reporters tell the gritty tale of how they did it. The story they tell is riveting, insightful and filled with new detail about that awful weekend that changed America.

Dan Rather - CBS News
People often ask me "what it was really like" to be in Dallas on the day Kennedy was shot. . . . When the News Went Live provides an eloquent answer to that tough question, as four newsmen who were there, on the ground, tell how it "really was" through their eyes and ears.

William Endicott - The Sacramento Bee
. . . a riveting account not only of the assassination but of TV's transformation into America's most dominant news source.

Robert French – Auburn University
If you are going to read one book about the events of November 22, it might as well be this one. It is a great book. The stories of these four men are quite remarkable. Students, they were—for the most part—just starting out in their careers. Imagine that for a moment. Powerful stories.

Sterlin Holmesly - The San Antonio Express-News
This work brings immediacy and intensity to events that shook the nation. You are there with the four, on the streets, at the hospital, along the flower-strewn Grassy Knoll the day after, in the jail as Oswald is paraded for the press and then for murder live on TV. Interwoven with this is the perspective of forty years from men grown old, who still live with November 1963.

Southwestern Historical Quarterly
In those terrible days they shared a common bond to report the news as they lived and witnessed it. Forty years later and still committed to the same principle, they offer the reader their observations. . . . a fascinating text.

William Kerns- The Lubbock Avalanche-Journal
. . . more than just a compelling read. It is an account of incredible from-the-streets reporting of history. readers will appreciate the opportunity to read transcripts of live reports, such as Huffaker confirming the assassination by saying, "This is one of the quietest crowds that will ever assemble - the crowd with pity, sorrow, horror and shame in its heart."
No less moving is Huffaker explaining to us 42 years later, "I hated having to speak when I felt like weeping."

Ken Judkins - The Lewisville Leader
. . . a first class account of a tragic historical moment that still has an impact on our nation.

Publishers Weekly
As each of the authors gives his account of the segment of the Kennedy assassination he was most involved with—the race to get the injured president to the hospital, Oswald's flight and capture, Ruby's shooting of Oswald, and Ruby's trial—he opens a window into that earlier era of broadcast history. In the conclusion, the contributors make comparisons to today's "embedded" reporters. . . . One big difference emerges: in 1963, the KRLD crew had a whole nation awaiting their latest report. The integrity and dedication of these four veteran journalists is impressive, as is their ability to make a 40-year-old event come alive again.

Library Journal
Their account of reporting the events surrounding Kennedy's death goes beyond mere retelling, reflecting on issues such as ethics and duty in the presentation of news. . . . the book is a fast-paced recounting of what they witnessed, accompanied by 43 evocative black-and-white photos . . . . It concludes with two thought-provoking chapters about the business of news and its uncertain future. Recommended for academic and public libraries devoting space to journalism.

Liberty Journal, RTNDA Communicator
Their account of reporting the events surrounding Kennedy’s death goes beyond mere retelling, reflecting on issues such as ethics and duty in the presentation of news.

Kelly Ricker, George Mason University Broadside
. . . these four local journalists were changing the face of news minute by minute. Bob Huffaker states in the preface, “Americans turned to their televisions and radios, and broadcasters assumed the task of reassuring a shocked nation and an anxious world. Broadcast journalism came of age in that crisis of grief and uncertainty, and as it drew its mourning audience, it helped to hold the nation together.”

James Ward Lee
This book brings us a version few have ever seen. Bill Mercer, Bob Huffaker, Wes Wise, and George Phenix lived this story minute by minute, hour by hour, day by day. Now they take us live and in living color back to those blood-dimmed days in Dallas. A stunning set of recollections.

Union University Review
. . . it tells of a time when the American public lost its innocence, and the authors in the last section of the book give us their perspectives on the changes in the news media that have taken place over the last 40 years. It is always helpful to get a look back to see how we got to where we are today, and these gentlemen have done an excellent job of that in light of the Kennedy assassination.

Anonymous said...

Jim Lehrer – The NewsHour - Here, finally, is the view from the street about November 22, 1963. This reporters' account of the Kennedy assassination brings to full focus the personal anguish as well as the professional pressure endured that day by those who could not take the time to cry. This book will become part of the real and permanent history of a dark day for America.

Kent Biffle - The Dallas Morning News
This book has more legs than the Rockettes. The slim page-turner possesses a crisp, objective quality that, like a good movie, never stops moving.

Bob Schieffer - CBS News
The first accounts of how the Kennedy assassination happened came from the local radio and TV reporters of Dallas. For the first time, some of the best of those reporters tell the gritty tale of how they did it. The story they tell is riveting, insightful and filled with new detail about that awful weekend that changed America.

Dan Rather - CBS News
People often ask me "what it was really like" to be in Dallas on the day Kennedy was shot. . . . When the News Went Live provides an eloquent answer to that tough question, as four newsmen who were there, on the ground, tell how it "really was" through their eyes and ears.

William Endicott - The Sacramento Bee
. . . a riveting account not only of the assassination but of TV's transformation into America's most dominant news source.

Robert French – Auburn University
If you are going to read one book about the events of November 22, it might as well be this one. It is a great book. The stories of these four men are quite remarkable. Students, they were—for the most part—just starting out in their careers. Imagine that for a moment. Powerful stories.

Sterlin Holmesly - The San Antonio Express-News
This work brings immediacy and intensity to events that shook the nation. You are there with the four, on the streets, at the hospital, along the flower-strewn Grassy Knoll the day after, in the jail as Oswald is paraded for the press and then for murder live on TV. Interwoven with this is the perspective of forty years from men grown old, who still live with November 1963.

Southwestern Historical Quarterly
In those terrible days they shared a common bond to report the news as they lived and witnessed it. Forty years later and still committed to the same principle, they offer the reader their observations. . . . a fascinating text.

William Kerns- The Lubbock Avalanche-Journal
. . . more than just a compelling read. It is an account of incredible from-the-streets reporting of history. readers will appreciate the opportunity to read transcripts of live reports, such as Huffaker confirming the assassination by saying, "This is one of the quietest crowds that will ever assemble - the crowd with pity, sorrow, horror and shame in its heart."
No less moving is Huffaker explaining to us 42 years later, "I hated having to speak when I felt like weeping."

Ken Judkins - The Lewisville Leader
. . . a first class account of a tragic historical moment that still has an impact on our nation.

Publishers Weekly
As each of the authors gives his account of the segment of the Kennedy assassination he was most involved with—the race to get the injured president to the hospital, Oswald's flight and capture, Ruby's shooting of Oswald, and Ruby's trial—he opens a window into that earlier era of broadcast history. In the conclusion, the contributors make comparisons to today's "embedded" reporters. . . . One big difference emerges: in 1963, the KRLD crew had a whole nation awaiting their latest report. The integrity and dedication of these four veteran journalists is impressive, as is their ability to make a 40-year-old event come alive again.

Library Journal
Their account of reporting the events surrounding Kennedy's death goes beyond mere retelling, reflecting on issues such as ethics and duty in the presentation of news. . . . the book is a fast-paced recounting of what they witnessed, accompanied by 43 evocative black-and-white photos . . . . It concludes with two thought-provoking chapters about the business of news and its uncertain future. Recommended for academic and public libraries devoting space to journalism.

Liberty Journal, RTNDA Communicator
Their account of reporting the events surrounding Kennedy’s death goes beyond mere retelling, reflecting on issues such as ethics and duty in the presentation of news.

Kelly Ricker, George Mason University Broadside
. . . these four local journalists were changing the face of news minute by minute. Bob Huffaker states in the preface, “Americans turned to their televisions and radios, and broadcasters assumed the task of reassuring a shocked nation and an anxious world. Broadcast journalism came of age in that crisis of grief and uncertainty, and as it drew its mourning audience, it helped to hold the nation together.”

James Ward Lee
This book brings us a version few have ever seen. Bill Mercer, Bob Huffaker, Wes Wise, and George Phenix lived this story minute by minute, hour by hour, day by day. Now they take us live and in living color back to those blood-dimmed days in Dallas. A stunning set of recollections.

Union University Review
. . . it tells of a time when the American public lost its innocence, and the authors in the last section of the book give us their perspectives on the changes in the news media that have taken place over the last 40 years. It is always helpful to get a look back to see how we got to where we are today, and these gentlemen have done an excellent job of that in light of the Kennedy assassination.

Anonymous said...

When the News Went Live: Dallas 1963 is not a novel. It chronicles the broadcast coverage of the JFK assassination and tells the entire story from the motorcade to the death of the assassin's assassin, Jack Ruby.

Thank you for mentioning this non-fiction book